DB 990 ~ 1972 Restoration

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ernneo
Posts: 4
Joined: Wed Oct 07, 2015 9:41 pm
Location: Hunsrück ( Germany /Rheinland- Palatinate)

DB 990 ~ 1972 Restoration

Post by ernneo » Thu Oct 29, 2015 8:23 pm

Hi guys,


found your page here a few days ago as I was searching online to get some books or help with the restoration of a DB 990 that I purchased recently.
Built around 1972 I have to pass it trough TÃœV ( technical control) first and some things have to be done first before it will pass...( new tires- new electrics- and a general oberhaul...oils and so on)

It looks like I will not have enough time to do the whole restoration this winter but hope that I can get it working properly and get the full restoration done the next winter...

Some pics of it to start,

Suggestions and help are always welcome!

Greetings from Germany,
ernneo
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Guest

RE: DB 990 ~ 1972 Restoration

Post by Guest » Thu Oct 29, 2015 9:19 pm

Welcome Emneo. The 990 looks reasonably tidy, metal work very straight and not terribly rusty, the makings of a pretty straight forward restoration and I should imagine that it has been quite well mechanically looked after, no visible oil leaks and has a new water pump fitted. Tell us what the serial number is and we can give you a fairly accurate year and month it came off the production line, the serial number will be on the aluminium plate on the left side of the clutch bell housing, as seen in picture 5. Another David Brown tractor coming into preservation. Please tell us more about the TUV technical control it has to go through, sounds like a version of the MOT (annual roadworthy test) that is required here for most vehicles but not agricultural tractors.

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ernneo
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Joined: Wed Oct 07, 2015 9:41 pm
Location: Hunsrück ( Germany /Rheinland- Palatinate)

Post by ernneo » Fri Oct 30, 2015 6:53 am

Hi powerabbit,

yes, absolutly agree with you about the condition of the tractor. the guy that had it before did already some work on it, the engine got already an overhaul ( new cylinder liners, new cylinder rings, new bearings,new set of cogwheels and new gaskets).
Also new is the waterpump ( correctly seen !) and the starter.
The TÃœV here in Germany is more or less the same then your MOT, but when you use the tractor on the streets and it runs faster then 6 km/h it needs to pass the TÃœV.
It's a technical control of the whole tractor and it mostly depends of the engineer ( yes a real engineer) who checks the whole functioning of it and gives you a go or a no-go.

Forseen for this winter is to get the electrics working properly ( the alternator controller is not working and most of the cables are rotten), welding and repainting the side fenders/ bonnet and last but not least a thorough wash of it...
By the way, does anybody know if there is a company who offers the whole wiring loom for the 990 ? If not ( have some knowledge in electrics) would do it myself...

It will be mostly used to do forest work( splitting, cutting and transporting wood) as we have a wooden heating and a chimney.

Looking fwd to start the work !

Greetings,

ernneo
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ernneo
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Location: Hunsrück ( Germany /Rheinland- Palatinate)

Post by ernneo » Fri Oct 30, 2015 6:59 am

Hi again,

Wanted to add that english is not my mother tongue and saw that I wrote some mistakes....

As my wife says: who finds them is allowed to keep them...;-). !

Greetings,

ernneo

Guest

Post by Guest » Fri Oct 30, 2015 9:29 am

Double post deleted.
Last edited by Guest on Fri Oct 30, 2015 11:44 am, edited 1 time in total.

Guest

Post by Guest » Fri Oct 30, 2015 9:30 am

Thanks for the TUV explanation, it is very much like our MOT but agricultural tractors are exempt from this here (at the moment) and also exempt from road fund duty (road Tax) The serial number in the pictures is a little difficult to determine but if I read it right it's 835873, this number tell me that it was manufactured in the first 3 months of 1973. The wiring could be difficult to source as it is in separate looms, sections connected with block connectors, engine connected to instruments and then another section to the wiring for the mudguard/fender mounted lighting. Wiring harness is available in it's earlier form with 'bullet' connections but many have said that these harnesses are missing wires and some of the wires are too short to reach what they connect to. I can send you a file of the earlier harness wiring diagram for the tractor if that would help and also the later loom type but the later loom one only shows the connections and not the individual wires, if you PM me your email address I will send the diagrams to you. With regards the engine, seems like someone's done all the hard and most expensive work which will make your task of restoring much easier and lighter on your pocket. As for your English, I was thinking at first that you may have been born in the UK and moved later. :)

JamesF
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Joined: Tue Mar 14, 2006 8:49 pm
Location: South Yorkshire

Post by JamesF » Fri Oct 30, 2015 11:36 am

The wiring although at first glance looks complicated is very simple.

Unless the wiring looms are missing completely you can repair and re wrap them fairly easily.

Iv restored a few tractors now and not tidy ones either, ones that were complete basket cases and even there iv managed to salvage the wiring. The replacement looms on the market are worse than useless.

All you need is some replacement wire of various sizes, plenty of crimp on connectors of various kinds, the pliers to crimp them on with, a wiring diagram and plenty of time!

One thing I will say speaking from experience with those early weather frame cab tractors is that if there is a hazard flasher kit fitted upgrade to the plastic cased flasher unit and later type switch, the early types were poor and didn't last long!

One thing to remember with electrics is that when something really odd is happening it's a bad earth. Also it would be worth fitting a battery isolated switch so when you leave it unattended you can isolate all the electrical items from their supply reducing the risk of fire should a fault develop

Guest

Post by Guest » Fri Oct 30, 2015 11:49 am

Looking at the picture of the right side of the engine the tractor has the earlier harness type of wiring which will be much easier to repair/replace than the later loom type so the wiring diagram for the pre-1977 990 will be your reference.

JamesF
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Joined: Tue Mar 14, 2006 8:49 pm
Location: South Yorkshire

Post by JamesF » Fri Oct 30, 2015 2:34 pm

You'll probably find the the wiring behind the dash panel is more or less intact but it will look like an assortment of meaningless wires.

Each wire is colour coded and it's easy to identify them. After a while you'll know the colours and what they mean without looking in the book.

As a starting point the live feed into the key switch is the heavy brown wire connected to terminal one. There will be a handful of green wires which are live feeds to the gauges, indicator switch. There will be a plastic fuse holder in the green wiring. There is a heavy brown wire feeding the light switch again through a fuse. You've got a starting point there and the rest can be reasoned out from there

Guest

Post by Guest » Fri Oct 30, 2015 3:54 pm

With respect James I think that the under dash wiring is a little more complicated than you lead the OP to believe, there are as you say a birds nest of wires but you need to know what goes where and which green ones go where according to the colour of the trace colour, some of the wires connect in series with each other through multi bullet connectors, then there's the diode on the temperature gauge etc etc. A wiring diagram is an absolute must if you're doing it yourself and if you're replacing missing or broken wires you also need to know what Amperage cabling you need to use to eliminate over and under current, there are 3 Amperages, 17, 10 and 8 which is easy to work out, not including the battery cables 17A is the thickest and 8A is the lightest.

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ernneo
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Location: Hunsrück ( Germany /Rheinland- Palatinate)

Post by ernneo » Sun Nov 01, 2015 8:32 am

Many thx for the quick replies and ideas concerning electrics!

So it looks like I will do the electrics new from scrap....will buy some braids ( hope that I get the correct cables- colorcoded) on the aftermarket...
But should not be the biggest problem also concerning the amps, better to put a bit bigger one then a too small one!

I checked again on the original picture and the correct serial number is: 855973
If you would be so kind and also explain me the coding of the serial numbers- guess the two last digits are for the year bit what do the others mean ?

Below you see some more pics of it's actual condition, will post more as soon as I started the work.
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Guest

Post by Guest » Sun Nov 01, 2015 9:09 am

The serial number does put it's date to mid 1973, the way the numbering system worked was that the very first white 990 carried the serial number of 100001 and all that followed were consecutive but other than that the numbers were not in themselves date codes.

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