Devon Branch Ploughing Day 23rd June.

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Devon Branch Ploughing Day 23rd June.

Post by Guest » Sun Jun 24, 2012 10:30 am

Our branch here in Devon yesterday held our ploughing day on Dartmoor in a ley field that had not been ploughed in living memory. The field is 4 & 1/2 acres and with 6 trtactors and 6 3 furrow ploughs taking part stating around 11.30am we finished the field including the headlands and stopping an hour for dinner, finised it at 3.30pm. A couple of the ploughs had not been used for many years and needed a lot of ajustment to get them working well, there were 2 non D.B. ploughs, one a 3 furrow Ferguson and a 3 furrow Ransomes trip leg, 5 D.B. tractors and 'one other'. The field did not have too many rocks in it but we did find a few with 2 ploughs breaking a share. Although quite windy and overcast with an early heavy shower the day was kind to us considering we were at an elevation of 1200 feet above sea level. I will post up more pictures if anyone wishes to see them.

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willieydb
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Post by willieydb » Sun Jun 24, 2012 11:38 am

Picture with tractor NGY842 has 3 eurrow PU mounted complete with lateral adjuster fitted.
I`m waiting for one of these attachments being sent from Westlakes
Picture shows skimmers, especially the rear one, barely doing the job. My theory from my younger days is that the plough is set too wide for the bodies fitted. I notice two block spacers fitted where one would have been better in this case especially for old grassland.
Otherwise the operator has the plough set a damned sight better than the others
Willie "Downunder"

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Post by Guest » Sun Jun 24, 2012 11:58 am

That particular plough Willie is set to 10" and the skimmers were not really doing very much, in fact the turf was so soft that it was clogging up the skimmers on a couple of the other ploughs so they had to be removed. Some were not burying the turf as well as others as one plough following a different one made it difficult for consistent and even burying of the turf, if each plough were plouging their own 'plot' then the turf would have been turned under better and the soil being rocky and quite stony made it difficult as well as whenever a rock or large stone was encountered the ploughs would have to be lifted a little to override them consequently making burying the turf even more difficult. We were ploughing in quite difficult conditions, very particular to our Dartmoor granite soil, not like the soft non stony sandy red soils further 'inland', you have to make the best job you can for the conditions, hit a large stone or a rock and you have to ajust the plough constantly.

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Post by Guest » Sun Jun 24, 2012 1:52 pm

Fixed arm skimmers would have vmade no difference. Your soil over there is totally different than ours so how you can say that without having ploughed our type of land I don't understand. :roll: As for any grass sticking out, it won't have a chance to grow as the field will be worked down straight away so that won't be an issue. Normally the field would have been sprayed and burnt off but the amount of rain we've had recently would be useless as it would not have worked. There will be a certain amount of turf come up but we're used to that. It will be re-seeded with a very short term grass seed, ploughed again next spring and sown to barley and undersown with a permanent pasture.

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mart1602
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Post by mart1602 » Sun Jun 24, 2012 2:16 pm

looks like fun to me,been thinking of trying a bit of ploughing myself never done any.a nice db plough would be good but they fetch a bit of money when i see them and mostly 2 furrows which would look daft behind the 1410

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richbug
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Post by richbug » Sun Jun 24, 2012 2:33 pm

mart1602 wrote:mostly 2 furrows which would look daft behind the 1410
But you could run as fast as you could go and still stay in the seat.
Users: 780, 1210 Bottle Opener, 1494 4wd open station with 74L, 990, 1394, 1194 High Clearance, another 1394, 1194 LCG, 1290 with 56L, 900, 885 with LS8, 885, 1190

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Parts: 3800, 1200, 1394, 1412, 1490, 770, 885, 990SEL, Red 990I,

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Post by Guest » Sun Jun 24, 2012 9:07 pm

The 25D here has turned out to be of more interest in that I noticed it had 2 different registration 'plates', the rear being a wired on tin plate and the front a very faded stencilled on one. The way that the front one is stencilled, and being a Devon registration, was done this way by one particular local dealer to me of which I have a copy of all tractors sold by them from new from 1946 to 1984, totaling some 2000 odd tractors. I looked through these records and found the registration and details of the tractor, it was registered on 17th March 1955 and was supplied new to an Uncle of mine just 4 miles from me, his Son still farms the same farm, this was up until now unknown by the tractors present owner and on its way to the ploughing day actually travelled on the road to the field that passes through the land on both sides of the road that this tractor was new to. Coincedence or what? Some of you might recognise the present owner who has owned this 25D for the past 40 years.

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calvin
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Post by calvin » Sun Jun 24, 2012 9:28 pm

it looks very good but saying that i have never ploughed in my life always wanted to try it but never really got round to it i have a two furrow ransom it could probley do with a set of discs but i havent a clue on setting it up aprt from keepin the plough level behind the tractor. And what tractor to try it with ???. cheers calvin
3 pot , 4 pot and the MIGHTY 6 POTT!

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Post by Guest » Sun Jun 24, 2012 10:16 pm

In order for the plough to pull square with the tractor the first thing you have to do is set the distance between the right hand side of the frame where the cross-shaft goes through it and the cross-shaft end of the link pin in relation to the rear wheel width setting of the tractor, for example, a wheel setting of 56", distance measurement on the plough cross-shaft must be 4". For these measurements to work the lift arms should be positioned to 'parallel linkage'. Initial settings are carried out before you even go near a field and then it might take a 1/2 acre of ground to get the plough set and working properly. It takes time and practice.

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expat
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Post by expat » Sun Jun 24, 2012 10:23 pm

Powerrabbit wrote:In order for the plough to pull square with the tractor the first thing you have to do is set the distance between the right hand side of the frame where the cross-shaft goes through it and the cross-shaft end of the link pin in relation to the rear wheel width setting of the tractor, for example, a wheel setting of 56", distance measurement on the plough cross-shaft must be 4". For these measurements to work the lift arms should be positioned to 'parallel linkage'. Initial settings are carried out before you even go near a field and then it might take a 1/2 acre of ground to get the plough set and working properly. It takes time and practice.
Do you have a diagram/annotated photo to explain this please? Trying to get a 2 furrow ford ferguson plough set up on the 880 and as I'm not of a farming background...!

Cheers :)

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Post by Guest » Sun Jun 24, 2012 11:11 pm

It would take up about 4 full pages of the Forum to give a comprehensive explanation, it's not that straight forward as there are so many factors in setting up a plough and will depend on what ajustment facilities are fitted to the plough, you really need to be in the field to be able to set the plough up properly, it's far easier to show someone rather than telling them in words. Even different tractor and makes of plough combinations put together will different in ajustment and setup requirements in order to get them to work together, there's a whole lot more to it than level and square.

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expat
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Post by expat » Mon Jun 25, 2012 6:28 pm

Ok - kind of thought it might be like that! Trial & error until I can find someone to show me then!

Cheers :)

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Post by Guest » Mon Jun 25, 2012 7:52 pm

If you have a vintage tractor club in the Channel Isles that do some ploughing it would be a good idea if you could join in or go to their events, there's always someone that will be willing to let you have a go and teach you, you really need to have a go to get the 'feel' of it and learn the ropes, you can read all the books and watch all the videos you like on ploughing but nothing is better than actually doing it. Ploughing is an art and is the first step in cultivating the land and when done properly to a good standard will ultimateley determine the growing and end product of the crop sown. There are numerous ploughing competitions held here in mainland UK but there seems to be an astounding lack of ploughing events soley dedicated to teaching ploughing skills. We have a lot of young lads here, sons and grandsons of our members around the age of 13 to 17 that have never ploughed but are very keen to learn, that's why we like to do some ploughing as we did on Saturday, to encourage them and let them have a go and learn the art, one of our members is nearly 40 and up to a couple of years ago had never touched a plough, now he goes off ploughing for other farmers.

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expat
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Post by expat » Mon Jun 25, 2012 10:43 pm

I wish there was! There are a few people with classic tractors but no club that I am aware of. Also no ploughing events :(

Too much knowledge is being lost and many of the old timers don't have the time (or inclination?) to share. That's why I'm glad for clubs like this (and others). To think that I was set on getting a massey once!

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Post by Guest » Mon Jun 25, 2012 11:27 pm

I've just managed to upload the vid I took of the ploughing on YouTube, the link is posted in nthe video section.

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