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Scooby
Posts: 3929
Joined: Tue Jan 03, 2006 8:16 pm
Location: Warwickshire

Not DB so if it offends then I apologise.

Post by Scooby » Tue Mar 15, 2016 4:30 pm

I know this isn't DB but I thought I would post it anyway. We had a garden hedge that was totally covered in ivy. So I ripped that off and laid the hedge. Horrible hedge to lay because of the trimming every year it was too bushy at the top and not tall enough. I could have let it grow up for a few years but decided to get it down now.

It's got one of two chances !


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Three is twee, four does snore, but 6 just clicks........Scooby

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case-ih1594
Posts: 1065
Joined: Sun May 12, 2013 10:38 am
Location: Preston

RE: Not DB so if it offends then I apologise.

Post by case-ih1594 » Wed Mar 16, 2016 7:50 am

Hi, this looks excellent. I too have been pulling / digging ivy from some of our hedges and it is a slow job! Most hedges you see are getting neglected as small farms disappear to be replaced by huge factory farms, and no one 'has time' to maintain their own drains, hedges, fences, trees.

Scooby
Posts: 3929
Joined: Tue Jan 03, 2006 8:16 pm
Location: Warwickshire

Post by Scooby » Wed Mar 16, 2016 9:27 am

Hello, and thank you for the kind words. The hedge was very thin and nothing was ever going to nest in there and so I thought I'd lay it in the hope that it would thicken out a bit. I was always taught that ivy isn't parasitic but I just don't believe it. Some of the really old trees round here are covered in it and you can see the tops suffering. I think ivy chokes the life out of things if allowed to get out of control.

However I don't agree with you when you say that most hedges are becoming neglected. What I do disagree with vehemently is when they are left for 2-4 years because they are in some sort of scheme and then they are bashed almost into oblivion.

And yes, small farms have, in the main, disappeared but that's progress and we stand in the way of that at our peril. When I started contracting there were plenty of 50-100 acre farmers around who milked 40 cows, had 100 ewes and grew 20-30 acres of corn and it was possuble to give the kids a private education on that ! But times change. I would love to go back to the 50s & 60s. Times were good for most of us. The countryside was full of country people who not only understood what farming was all about but a lot of them would come and give you a chuck with a few bales in the evening when they had finished their day jobs. But we can't turn the clock back.

But I think that the phrase "factory farms" is ambiguous. Remember the battery cages for laying hens ? All gone now. Sow stalls ? All gone now. Instead we have huge machines costing a fortune that get over incredible acreages with one man. That's progress whether we like it or not and if we try and stand in the way of it we get trampled.
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Three is twee, four does snore, but 6 just clicks........Scooby

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smiddytheman
Posts: 32
Joined: Fri Jun 15, 2012 6:01 pm
Location: DROMORE, CO DOWN.

Post by smiddytheman » Mon Apr 04, 2016 8:53 pm

Hello Scooby,
Just seen this post re the hedges. I have lots of problems with Ivy growing in thorn hedges, and its very time consuming to remove. Have you any magic cure to kill Ivy? I have been using neat Round-Up painted on the cut ends, and this works well, but is slow to do. Your hedging looks a work of art, and if your ever in the area I could use some tips/guidance!! To keep me right with other forum members, I'm using the 1490 and linkbox around the hedges, so there is a DB involvement.

Best regards...

Scooby
Posts: 3929
Joined: Tue Jan 03, 2006 8:16 pm
Location: Warwickshire

Post by Scooby » Mon Apr 04, 2016 10:14 pm

smiddytheman wrote:Hello Scooby,
Just seen this post re the hedges. I have lots of problems with Ivy growing in thorn hedges, and its very time consuming to remove. Have you any magic cure to kill Ivy? I have been using neat Round-Up painted on the cut ends, and this works well, but is slow to do. Your hedging looks a work of art, and if your ever in the area I could use some tips/guidance!! To keep me right with other forum members, I'm using the 1490 and linkbox around the hedges, so there is a DB involvement.

Best regards...
Hello SmiddytheMan and thank you for your kind words. I haven't found a magic potion to get rid of ivy in a hedge but this was only a short run and so I pulled it out by the roots. When it's round trees it is a chainsaw job but of course you don't get the roots out but it steadies it up for a few years and in fact sometimes it dies anyway after that kind of treatment.
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Three is twee, four does snore, but 6 just clicks........Scooby

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cobbadog
Posts: 611
Joined: Tue Oct 11, 2011 6:18 am
Location: beautiful Coopernook NSW. near Taree. NSW. Australia

Re: Not DB so if it offends then I apologise.

Post by cobbadog » Fri Dec 30, 2016 4:59 am

Something to aid the use of round up on woody stems is to mix it 50/50 with dieseline. This is something that an old farmer told me a long time back. The idea behind it is that the diesel thins the round up and really penetrates down deep and quick. It worked very well on some cannon lillies I had and only took one dose of brushing the mix on the freshly cut stems.

John.Newman
Posts: 269
Joined: Sun May 27, 2007 3:21 am
Location: Gowrie Junction, via Toowoomba, Qld, Australia

Re: Not DB so if it offends then I apologise.

Post by John.Newman » Mon Feb 27, 2017 11:03 am

Great hedge-work Scooby, hope all is well your way.
To clear woody weeds on our property such as the Giant African Boxthorn, I use the herbicide made by DOW called "Access" which is a blend of Triclophr and Picloram. This is an oil based concentrate and I mix it 1 part to 60 parts diesel and use a 1 litre hand spray bottle to apply it to plant stems after cutting about 3" above ground level. Works on any woody weed or plant with 95 - 100% success rate. It has to be sprayed immediately after cutting before the sap seals off the stem and will even work by spraying directly to the trunk. Luckily, it can be obtained in 1 litre bottles from farm supplies and even then still costs about $90 or 50 pounds Sterling.
Regards, John

Scooby
Posts: 3929
Joined: Tue Jan 03, 2006 8:16 pm
Location: Warwickshire

Re: Not DB so if it offends then I apologise.

Post by Scooby » Mon Feb 27, 2017 12:00 pm

Morning John, yes, all well here thank you, I hope you and your family are all well. We've had no Winter here really but I wish Spring would hurry up and show it's face. Having said that it has been very mild, quite a few early flowers out and the hedge is just coming into bud nicely so it looks as if it survived the massacre !
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Three is twee, four does snore, but 6 just clicks........Scooby

John.Newman
Posts: 269
Joined: Sun May 27, 2007 3:21 am
Location: Gowrie Junction, via Toowoomba, Qld, Australia

Re: Not DB so if it offends then I apologise.

Post by John.Newman » Tue Feb 28, 2017 11:34 am

All well here Scooby. Had record temperatures though with not much rain (record max of 42 deg C at our place) and even less grass in the paddocks. Only my Chamberlain is getting used at present, and that is mainly for carting water in 2000l loads to supplement our garden water as we are not on town water.

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