frontloader DB 1690

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jluttikhof
Posts: 27
Joined: Wed Mar 01, 2006 8:42 pm

frontloader DB 1690

Post by jluttikhof » Sat Mar 11, 2006 11:23 am

Hello,

I want to buy a original frontloader of a DB 1690. Does somebody knows how much it could lift, and what price i could give.

Jan

joeproctor
Posts: 1738
Joined: Fri Dec 30, 2005 3:07 pm
Location: drax, nr, selby, north yorkshire
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front loader

Post by joeproctor » Sat Mar 11, 2006 7:41 pm

the big db loader is on top of the job power matched ,and thats just what it is ,i cant give you it's lifting capacity but can tell you that they are thin on the ground expect to pay from £600 to £1200 ish depending on what buckets come with it .
i have never seen a knackered one thats how 'on top of the job'they are.
regards
joe

jonferson
Posts: 109
Joined: Mon Jan 09, 2006 1:15 pm
Location: Weston Super Mare - North Somerset - UK

RE: front loader

Post by jonferson » Mon Mar 13, 2006 10:05 am

Joe

which loader are you refering two I know there are several types that fit the 94's and presume the 90's as well hd, gd, qd and I think there were some L sereies but I dont know a lot about them

User avatar
Madders
Posts: 2433
Joined: Tue Feb 28, 2006 9:52 pm
Location: Holmfirth

RE: front loader

Post by Madders » Wed Mar 15, 2006 9:47 pm

The big L1500 case power loader is a bit of an animal, but be wary of getting giddy as castings get terminally upset with hard graft. Seen one on a 1594 but it had about 600kg on the back end to spread the pain!

Hell of a tool tho!

These fella's aren't cheap and I have known one with a 4 in 1 bucket fetch£2k

DB QD/GD BETWEEN £6-1.5K

Some abused stuff about tho', watch out for elongation through the pin holes and weld used to repair the damage.

Hope this helps.
[.................................[/size] Image

Eric_T
Posts: 1408
Joined: Sat Dec 31, 2005 11:57 am
Location: North Wales

Post by Eric_T » Thu Mar 16, 2006 12:07 pm

Keep away from loaders that have been welded up, more often than not, you are just asking for trouble!

Eric

R.Poff
Posts: 66
Joined: Fri Dec 30, 2005 3:10 pm

Post by R.Poff » Thu Mar 16, 2006 12:44 pm

I am in agreement w/ Madders and Eric, but only on the pin holes. If the holes are not damaged as described, you can hardface over a break, and it will be stronger if done properly. The unfortunate circumstance is, usually the pins and pivots are the first to go when one is used heavily. I have seen many a farmer buy a new F/L. hard surface the arms and bucket, and then the strength of the faced surfaces will exceed the strength of the pivots.
BTW, for any interested, I have finished the addition of the remote on the 885.
Mercy, how did I manage without it before?!!!
I have a set of round bale forks, and have used them for everyting since the addition. Have on old rear dirt scoop, and now it is a rear bucket. I went the cheap route (you farmers will understand this) and went from the manifold into a 4 way open center. In retrospect, probably should have added a stacker. Added this and 5000 psi rated line w/ quick connects for around 430 dollars. There is a place www.supplycenter.com, that I bought fittings and cylinder from. You USA guys should check it out, new surplus cheap. Now that I think, it might be surplus center.com. Anyway,
Keep'er between the ditches
Rob

Eric_T
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Joined: Sat Dec 31, 2005 11:57 am
Location: North Wales

Post by Eric_T » Thu Mar 16, 2006 1:10 pm

Sorry Rob,

I do not agree with you here, if they are welded, you can safely assume that they will break again at the same point, weld again, break again... etc etc etc!

Eric

R.Poff
Posts: 66
Joined: Fri Dec 30, 2005 3:10 pm

Post by R.Poff » Thu Mar 16, 2006 8:00 pm

I would agree with you on a straight weld -up- the crack repair. I am talking about a frame weld that is 1st welded, then a larger piece/pieces are layered and completely welded around. This is no quick fix, but it is a good fix, and relatively cheap, if you have the welder and the steel laying around.
Personally, I would not just weld a break back together. I have had too many of exactly what you have described happen too many times.
Say you have a 6x4 piece of tube frame to break or develop a crack.
Weld the crack
Then take two slightly larger pieces of L, say 1.5 ft long, same guage and thickness, grind to fit, place one on the topside and tack it. Place the other on the bottom side and tack. Now your L steel should make a llarger piece of tube that will act like a splint on a broken arm. Weld all seams. This has taken the better part of a day before, but has proven cheaper and less time consuming than getting a new frame or bucket. And I have never seen this break again.
The trick is to not get the original metal too hot, or it will break elsewhere. I also agree, do not attemp to weld around the pivots.
Eric, you have good experience. Were you/are you a mechanic?
Regards,
Rob

joeproctor
Posts: 1738
Joined: Fri Dec 30, 2005 3:07 pm
Location: drax, nr, selby, north yorkshire
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front loader

Post by joeproctor » Thu Mar 16, 2006 8:40 pm

do remember the loader that we started talking about is 'the loader' that puts loaders to shame i have not seen a rough big loader yet ,i cant imagine that the qd/hd loader could be falling to bits like you lads are talking about this one was built for you rough tough abusive farmhands to try and bust.
if you have bust one of these loaders then you should repair it properly fit new bushes and if you have to weld cracks ,gouge them out and weld up not just laying weld on top,to make a stiffer job put some tidy reinforcing plates over the top in diamond shapes this looks nicer and will give more penetration to welds in different positions,
try not to galavant across stubble running over tramlines with a ************ big heston stuck up in the air!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
regards
joe

Eric_T
Posts: 1408
Joined: Sat Dec 31, 2005 11:57 am
Location: North Wales

Post by Eric_T » Fri Mar 17, 2006 12:57 pm

Rob,

I am studying to become an engineer, I have seen, on paper, in the field and in the workshop that if you weld steel without much though, the life of that structure is substancially reduced. This is due to the Weld process t itself.

If a unwelded structure is failing due to fatigue, chances are that it has had either a long and useful life or that it is badly desinged and there is a stress concentration in that particular part. DB loaders were well designed and as Joe says, they have survived many years at the hands of farmers who bounce things through tramlines etc!

Therfore, a weld run in the wrong place will be a temporary cure but you can expect it to fail again before to long. On the other hand, the best answer is to replace the whole beam, this wont be happening so what you describe is the best alternative!

Dont just bang a plate on and weld around it, think of how and where to weld, hopefully you will move the weld detail away from the highly stressed area and the life of the loader will be lengthened once again!

Sorry if im banging on and rambling here!!

Eric

R.Poff
Posts: 66
Joined: Fri Dec 30, 2005 3:10 pm

Post by R.Poff » Fri Mar 17, 2006 6:27 pm

Not at all, it is good to hear from lots of people on a particular subject. We have done many a weld job, some successful, others not so. I have no degree in metallurgy and my formal education in welding was practical, not studied.
Yes, I wholeheartedly agree that if you do not study how the weld needs to be laid out, you will regret it later on during the life of the implement.
Farmers will fix something until it costs them more to fix it than to buy a new item.
You guys have a good weekend.
Rob

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