Antifreeze in cropmaster

The place to discuss all matters relating to David Brown Tractors. You will need to register your user name before you can post. If you have already registered could you please make sure that your location details have been completed. Go to My Account in the Main Menu on the left, and then go into "Edit Your Information" and complete your location details. Give the Country (and State/Province if you wish) if outside the U.K. County if within the U.K. Location details helps other members if you need spares, technical advice, or the nearest practical help.

DISCLAIMER -

David Brown Tractor Club Ltd
Forum/website Disclaimer

1. This [forum/website/chat room] and the advice and opinions expressed herein is not a solution for mechanical, electrical, valuations, other problems, breakdowns or issues experienced in relation to the vehicles referenced.

2. If reliance is thought to be placed on any of the information guidance or input provided such information will be expressly confirmed as appropriate to be relied upon.

3. In the absence of any such confirmation no reliance should be suggested or inferred.

4. Members must not disclose information to 3rd parties in anticipation that reliance will be given by non-members.

5. Non-members must not purport to give advice on behalf of David Brown Tractor Club.

6. If you or someone you know is experiencing difficulties or repeated breakdowns you must seek assistance for an appropriately qualified expert who holds themselves out as such.

7. Any comments are free of charge and made or posted on an ex gratia basis. No member or non-member may advertise their professional services

Any user inactive for more than 3 months will automatically be deactivated, please contact admin@dbtc.co.uk if you would like to be reactivated.

Please be aware that your user name and entered location can be seen by all members. We only store information you have entered which is your email address and username, your IP is also stored, we have no access to private passwords.

If you do not agree with your information being stored, please do not register an account, If you wish to unsubscribe at any time please email admin@dbtc.co.uk giving your username.

Amended 27/10/18

Moderators: Segrie61, admin

User avatar
barryt
Posts: 16
Joined: Thu Oct 29, 2015 3:37 pm
Location: North Wales

Antifreeze in cropmaster

Post by barryt » Thu Nov 12, 2015 6:47 pm

Hi,

I'm assuming that 33% is adequate antifreeze in a VAK 1C Cropmaster. My question is 33% of what? I don't know how much water there is in a cropmaster.

BarryT

User avatar
db2d
Posts: 2098
Joined: Fri Feb 24, 2012 10:01 pm
Location: Monmouthshire

RE: Antifreeze in cropmaster

Post by db2d » Thu Nov 12, 2015 7:12 pm

Five litres of antifreeze is near enough.

Guest

RE: Antifreeze in cropmaster

Post by Guest » Thu Nov 12, 2015 7:20 pm

The capacity of the cooling system is 4 and a 1/4 gallons so the proportions would be 1 and a 1/3rd gallon of antifreeze in 2 and 2/3rds gallons of water. Mix the antifreeze in a gallon of warm water first, pour half of it in the tractor, start the engine and then pour in the rest, then pour in the rest of the water slowly to allow circulation, replace the radiator cap and leave the engine running so it can mix and after around ten minutes check the level in the radiator and top it up if needed. 33% will give you frost protection down to minus 30 degrees C.

JamesF
Posts: 1327
Joined: Tue Mar 14, 2006 8:49 pm
Location: South Yorkshire

RE: Antifreeze in cropmaster

Post by JamesF » Thu Nov 12, 2015 8:09 pm

Go for a 50/50 mix, it's easier to calculate guarantees protection and despite what some claim makes no difference to the efficiency of the cooling system

User avatar
barryt
Posts: 16
Joined: Thu Oct 29, 2015 3:37 pm
Location: North Wales

Post by barryt » Thu Nov 12, 2015 8:32 pm

Thanks guys will get some in the morning.

BarryT

User avatar
dtw
Posts: 39
Joined: Tue Nov 23, 2010 11:08 pm
Location: newfoundland canada

Post by dtw » Fri Nov 13, 2015 4:34 am

Hello to all viewers of DBTC sites.
Winter is coming on , we all need antifreeze, for the upcoming winter season, and it is also needed during the summer season.We will talk about winter for now.
Again I live in Newfoundland , Canada where it is not uncommon for the temperature to drop,during the winter as low as -30-35 c, and most times there is a wind chill associated with the cold.
With the wind and low temperatures, sometimes it gets extremely cold.

My brother is a manager of a heavy equipment truck shop ,(supplying new parts and tires , along with all the accessories to all tractor trailer, dumps and farm tractor parts) locally and to drivers who do long haul to Newfoundland and Labrador.

He , through his company, has put off a session twice a week during lunch times , for the past few weeks on the variate of anti-frees.

This is not by trade mark or name , only by color.

I have caught the tail end of his last session , but here in Newfoundland there three types of anti freeze

Pink , only for anything to do with aluminum engines or components
RED , mostly do do with diesel engines with steel block,older cars and trucks
Clear at most times can be used when either of the above are unavailable,compatible, with most but change as soon as possible.
He states if you want a premix anti freeze (50/50) purchase from a supplier due to contaminates in the 50% water mix (heavy metals , chlorine , etc)

Also is a trade mark antifreeze witch is yellow but i did not catch what it was used for.

(1) If Ivan is viewing he can clarify or expand on this topic ..
(2) When I get to talk to my brother next week I will get a copy of his paper work and put it on line.

All the best
Keep warm
DTW

User avatar
ollek
Posts: 3816
Joined: Tue Apr 10, 2012 1:20 pm
Location: South West Finland

Post by ollek » Fri Nov 13, 2015 2:45 pm

The following will give you the approximate freezing points for different percentage of Ethylene Glycol antifreeze in the water.
15 % glycol: minus 5 degrees C / 25 % glycol: minus 12 degrees C / 33 % glycol: minus 18 degrees C / 40 % glycol: minus 27 degrees C / 50 % glycol: minus 35 degrees C / 53 % glycol: minus 40 degrees C.
Because the antifreeze contains rust inhibitors, it is advised by engine manufacturers to use the 50 % mixture to get the best possible protection against rusting of the engine. The 50 % mixture also safeguards against frost damages in almost all European countries. It is also advisable not to use more than a 60 % mixture, as this antifreeze content will give the lowest protection temperature, approximately minus 45 degrees C. A bigger content than 60 % will result in the protection temperature rising. Plain ethylene glycol (not mixed in water) will freeze at minus 12 degrees C.

broadsword
Posts: 1707
Joined: Thu Jun 12, 2008 9:17 pm
Location: Holmfirth, Huddersfield

Post by broadsword » Fri Nov 13, 2015 2:52 pm

Barry,
have mine at about 50% mix which is probably overkill to be honest in the UK climate but I use the theory that they are still making antifreeze but they stopped making Cropmaster engine blocks a long time ago :D

Cheers

Andy

Guest

Post by Guest » Fri Nov 13, 2015 4:59 pm

Whatever the properties and formulae of antifreeze use the old blue coloured type as the modern red, yellow, orange and green stuff will rot cast iron blocks and copper radiator cores. Use to a 33% or 50% solution, keep some of the same solution for topping up and change every 2 to 3 years, that's all anyone really needs to know.

User avatar
ollek
Posts: 3816
Joined: Tue Apr 10, 2012 1:20 pm
Location: South West Finland

Post by ollek » Fri Nov 13, 2015 5:32 pm

This is an international forum and therefore it can be of vital importance for some readers to know how much antifreeze is needed in order to prevent freezing in their climate.
All Ethylene Glycol antifreeze, regardless of colour, have inhibitors that prevents the cooling system from corroding.

Guest

Post by Guest » Fri Nov 13, 2015 6:45 pm

If you spend a little time in reading about different antifreeze products you will learn that the modern types have chemical inhibitors that are formulated more specifically for the modern engines that are manufactured from alloy metals and aluminium, the inhibitors formulated to inhibit corrosion in these engines can have a very corrosive effect on older engines with cast iron blocks and also on the copper radiator cores.

User avatar
bedwards1966
Posts: 864
Joined: Sun Mar 07, 2010 10:36 pm
Location: North Yorkshire

Post by bedwards1966 » Fri Nov 13, 2015 7:12 pm

I don't think there is any disagreement that ethylene glycol is the only antifreeze to use in David Brown tractors.

In all but the very warmest parts of the UK I would suggest not using less than a 50% mixture. It may not apply to everybody as uses of our machines vary, but as well as freezing protection having a good mix of antifreeze allows a little room for topping up with plain water if you end up out and unexpectedly need to top up. Or, the issue I usually find, is ****s who just top up with water because they're too stupid/lazy to do it properly, and having a strong mix makes it less likely that you'll need to drain any out afterwards, or that it'll freeze if you don't find out that it needs checking.

User avatar
mistermcgregor
Posts: 157
Joined: Sat Sep 08, 2012 10:09 pm
Location: Southampton

Post by mistermcgregor » Fri Nov 13, 2015 7:12 pm

I must agree with the posts by Ollek on this subject. I have never seen or heard of cast iron being destroyed by Ethylene Glycol antifreeze with lnhibitors but I have seen the consequences of its absence other than freezing. A detailed explanation of how this occurs with red and green coloured solutions etc would be most interesting to everyone.

broadsword
Posts: 1707
Joined: Thu Jun 12, 2008 9:17 pm
Location: Holmfirth, Huddersfield

Re: RE: Antifreeze in cropmaster

Post by broadsword » Fri Nov 13, 2015 7:17 pm

Powerrabbit wrote: 33% will give you frost protection down to minus 30 degrees C.
Tim - is that Centrigrade or did you mean Farenheit ???

Cheers

Andy
Last edited by broadsword on Fri Nov 13, 2015 7:30 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Guest

RE: Re: RE: Antifreeze in cropmaster

Post by Guest » Fri Nov 13, 2015 7:22 pm

Sorry Andy, the figure should have been minus 35F not C. I should think that Barry T will have enough information now to make up his own mind as to what type and how much antifreeze to put in his tractor.

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 17 guests