Nob is grinding into the tyre wall. DB 1412

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vuk
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Nob is grinding into the tyre wall. DB 1412

Post by vuk » Mon Nov 09, 2015 3:53 pm

Hi
The nob on the side of the "steering arm" is grinding its way into the wall of the tyre.
I am pretty sure that something is way to worn down but I can´t quite figure out what the remedy is. What do I need to replace and how do I do that?
Thank you ;-)
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Grinding on back of tyre
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DB 1412 1977

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ollek
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RE: Nob is grinding into the tyre wall. DB 1412

Post by ollek » Mon Nov 09, 2015 4:05 pm

There is a few possibilities. Worn wheel bearings or worn king pin bushes can be the reason. Lift the front wheel of the ground and check by grabbing the wheel at the top and the bottom and pull and push at the wheel. There is also a possibility that you have wrong wheel centres and/or too wide front tyres. If the reason is worn wheel bearings, change the bearings as soon as possible. Worst scenery is that you will lose the wheel.

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dexta
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RE: Nob is grinding into the tyre wall. DB 1412

Post by dexta » Mon Nov 09, 2015 6:52 pm

the kingpin and stub for the hub shouldn't have changed angle at all unless its had a really heavy knock, my guess would be worn/collapsed wheel bearing as this would allow the hub to angle over on the stub and the tractors weight to push down and lean the wheel into the tractor, this making it rub on the arm on top of kingpin as you find here.
there is also the possibility as Ollek said of the tyres being to wide, however if the tyres are both the same size on both sides and one is rubbing and the other isn't then maybe its a bearing.
I could be wrong though, i have been before.
Cheers

Dex

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DB780
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Post by DB780 » Tue Nov 10, 2015 8:16 am

Try jacking the wheel off the ground I'm sure it will be clear what's wrong then.

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vuk
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Post by vuk » Wed Nov 11, 2015 4:24 pm

So I jacked op the wheel off the ground and I hoped the bearing would feel slack but it did not. Not at all actually. It was tight and I could not move it at all.
I measured the width on both tyres and it seems that the one in questions here is aprx. 2 cm wider than the other. I recently had a mechanic replace a worn out tyre with this brand new one so it makes sense that it could be too wide.
Thank you for your help
DB 1412 1977

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case-ih1594
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Post by case-ih1594 » Wed Nov 11, 2015 4:32 pm

Hi, the bearings clearly need checking and probably adjusting (to remove the tightness), and probably greasing.

Also surely someone should have noticed the tyre was jammed against the knob when fitting it.

Otherwise a good tyre has just been destroyed for no reason.

Guest

Post by Guest » Wed Nov 11, 2015 8:17 pm

vuk wrote:
I measured the width on both tyres and it seems that the one in questions here is aprx. 2 cm wider than the other. I recently had a mechanic replace a worn out tyre with this brand new one so it makes sense that it could be too wide
What is the size of the tyre on the other side and what is the size of the damaged one?

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vuk
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Post by vuk » Thu Nov 12, 2015 7:04 am

They are both 7.50 x 16. The undamaged one measures approx. 20 cm in width and the damaged one measures approx. 22 cm in width. I used a ruler across the opperside of the tyres so the measures are not 100 % precise. I measured the tyres where they are widest.
DB 1412 1977

Guest

Post by Guest » Thu Nov 12, 2015 9:19 am

If the tyres are the same size, as in 7.50x16 and one is not being grooved by the steering arm lug then one of two things is causing one to be damaged, either the one that's damaged has a greater ply rating which means the walls are wider, a 10 ply will be much wider than a 6 ply, or the wheel hub bearings have been adjusted so much in their life that the hub is now closer to the kingpin, if the latter is the case you will see by removing the cap on the end of the wheel hub and noticing what position the split pin is in, the outer or inner hole, and how far the castleated nut is screwed on, there should be one thick washer behind the nut against the outer bearing. Also you can measure the gap between the inner edge of each hub and the kingpin tube to see if one is closer than the other. The measurement in tyre size is determined by the width between the beads on the rim.

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ollek
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Post by ollek » Thu Nov 12, 2015 10:00 am

The inner conical bearing can not wear so much that the tyre will touch the steering arm. If the wheel hub moves inwards more than a couple of tenth of a millimetre (0,2 mm) due to a bearing problem, then the bearing is completely damaged and there will be a big play at the wheel hub. The problem here can be, that the spindle is bent due to over load from a front loader or abusing driving over ruff ground. The other possibility is that the tyre is not a 3-rib tyre meant for tractor front wheels. The tyre can be for different use, for example trailers or earth moving machines.

Guest

Post by Guest » Thu Nov 12, 2015 10:37 am

The spindle, or more correctly, the stub axle, on this axle does not bend, they are pretty tough but they can fracture and break under excessive load or shock. I have seen several hubs worn against the kingpin due to worn inner bearings due to poor maintenance or bodgers just adding more washers behind the castleated nut. As I say, without actually being there to inspect it it's either the bearings or the wrong ply tyre.

Another thought that crosses my mind is, is it the correct wheel? what if any is the difference between the offset of the centre of each front wheel?

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ollek
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Post by ollek » Thu Nov 12, 2015 11:14 am

The stub axles do bend under severe loadings and it has happened many times. This can be found by checking the camber of both wheels. The positive camber angle on a 1412 is quite big because the manufacturer has wanted to reduce the steering effort required and thereby minimising the load on the parts in the steering system. A bent stub axle will soon brake and shall be changed as soon as possible. The inner bearing must wear to the extent that the wheel hub moves inwards about 10 mm or more before the tyre gets in contact with the steering arm. Not very likely without a big bearing play and a noisy bearing being noticed I would say.

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vuk
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Post by vuk » Thu Nov 12, 2015 11:21 am

Looks ok, right?

The tyre reads "FARM KING".
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DB 1412 1977

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ollek
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Post by ollek » Thu Nov 12, 2015 11:55 am

Farm King is a tyre brand and these tyres are made in India. They make a lot of different tyre types and some pictures of the tyres may be useful. Just the tyre brand does not help in checking if the tyre fitted is the correct one or not. The picture of the bearing adjusting nut looks OK. Please check the camber angle on both sides.

Guest

Post by Guest » Thu Nov 12, 2015 12:08 pm

The bearing position does look okay but you still need to wobble the wheel top and bottom to see if there is any movement. As for the tyre it is the ply rating that we need to know, this will be found moulded into the side wall and will be a number followed by 'ply rating' or just 'ply', it could be 4 ply 6, 8 or 10 ply and as I said before, the greater the ply the wider the tyre will be from wall to wall. A picture of both the inside and outside of the wheel showing the position of the centre in relation to the rim would help determine if the wheel is the correct offset, I question the wheel as being silver it is probably a replacement and may be the wrong offset.

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